Fortress UAV Launches Fortress UAV Protect, A Preventative Maintenance Program

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(Plano, TX) - September 19, 2018 - Fortress UAV, a leading provider of drone repair services, announces the launch of Fortress UAV Protect - a new drone preventative maintenance program. Fortress UAV Protect is a nose-to-tail preventative maintenance service that rivals those of manned aircraft maintenance services.

Fortress UAV Protect will provide customers with a per drone maintenance schedule that includes an industry standard maintenance checklist plus check points specific to the particular drone model being serviced.

Current drone models included in the maintenance program: DJI Mavic Pro, DJI Phantom 4, DJI Inspire 1, DJI Inspire 2, DJI Matrice 600 and DJI Matrice 200/210. More models to come.

“At Fortress UAV, we are always in pursuit of new and innovative services that provide our customers with the support they need and the peace of mind they deserve,” said Brendon Mills, CEO of Fortress UAV.

With the preventative maintenance program, customers will help mitigate and reduce the risk of accidents and/or crashes, lessen costs by maximizing the lifespan of their drone assets, reduce the risk of liability should an accident and/or crash occur, ensure drones are flight-ready and have maximum uptime, and get a step ahead of any FAA mandated UAS maintenance reporting regulations.

Fortress UAV will provide an easily accessible, full-detailed report of all maintenance checks performed plus any additional comments or findings. These reports can be compiled to present a clear and concise drone maintenance log for each drone being covered.

“Fortress UAV provides top-notch drone repair services and has unbeatable customer service. By adding preventative maintenance to our contract services, we no longer worry about our drones being flight-ready. Their team performs all the checks necessary to confirm the airworthiness of our drones, providing us peace of mind. We can focus on what matters most - providing our services to the community,” stated Barry Moore, Mansfield, TX Police UAS Pilot.

Fortress UAV is establishing itself as a leader in drone maintenance regulatory reporting needs. Although there are not currently FAA mandated regulations surrounding the prescriptive maintenance of drones, it seems it is only time before they are established. Fortress UAV Protect customers will be a step ahead in not only acquiring the regulated maintenance but also in providing the necessary reporting to the FAA. For full FAA UAS regulations and policies, please visit here.

“The need for drone maintenance reporting is inevitable. Receiving and creating a log of all maintenance performed on your assets will only put your business ahead of the curve once the FAA maintenance mandates arrive,” said Garret Bryl, Principal Aerospace Software Engineer and UAS pilot for the Public Safety UAS Response Team.

Sample core maintenance check points include: Visual inspection of all moving parts for wear/tear and water damage, inspection of all wiring, cleaning of any dirt and/or debris, running key performance tests on batteries, upgrades to software, key calibrations, and the visual inspection and balancing of propellers and replacement of some components by drone type.

It is important to note that this is not a warranty or repair program. This program is intended for preventative uses only – identification of potential risk factors before an accident occurs.

This new service is in addition to the already existing, successful national drone repair business model that was launched in 2017. Fortress UAV is proud to be a leader in providing UAS maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO).

To speak with a Fortress UAV maintenance expert, please call (469) 808-1299 or email uavsales@fortressuav.com.

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